27 Health Tips For Foreign Travel

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When you leave the comfort of your home country and travel to different climates and environments abroad, you risk exposure to diseases and health risks. Diseases that are not prevalent in the US such as malaria, dengue fever, rabies and yellow fever are prevalent in other countries. It’s important that you understand what to do in order to stay healthy during your foreign travel.

Vaccinations And Immunizations

Even as you decide on your next destination, do the following:

Check the CDC website for information on prevalent diseases and health outbreaks at your destination

Discuss the list of health risks with your doctor and find out what immunizations and vaccinations you need

Some vaccinations need to be taken several months before travel, so be sure to plan your travel according to your vaccination schedule

If you’re visiting a dengue and malaria prone area, you may need to continually take anti-malarial medication during your travel

Existing Medical Conditions

Understand that you may fall sick while abroad; take precautions in advance. Do the following if you have an existing medical condition: You can also learn about “where can fillers be used on face“, click here

Take out sufficient travel insurance when you know that you could fall sick during your travel. You want to avoid major medical bills, if possible, or at least obtain reimbursements for medical treatment on foreign shores

Carry sufficient quantity of prescription medications to last the duration of your trip. Don’t presume that you might be able to buy more medications at your destination; you may not get the same brand, or the same dosage elsewhere

When you get to your destination, register with your home country’s embassy and ask them to refer a suitable hospital and doctor for you.

Visit the doctor at the earliest possible and show your most recent medical reports and your medications. Make sure the doctor is available for you if there’s an emergency

If you have any major allergies or if you suffer from diabetes or similar conditions, instruct your hotel management on emergency help

Carry a card in your wallet at all times, listing allergies, if any, especially allergies to medicines.

If you are a diabetic, make sure the hotel management knows what first aid to provide if you have a hypo or hyperglycemic attack. Write down detailed instructions and leave your glucometer on a table where it’s easily visible.

Make sure your travel insurer knows about existing medical conditions if any. This may hike up your premium, but it’s well worth it if you fall sick and need help with bill payment or reimbursement.

If you have any pre-existing medical condition, check with your doctor how the travel, local climate and pollution levels may affect you

Pre-Travel Consultation And Advice

Before traveling, make sure you consult with your doctor and get some pre-travel consultation and advice.

If you are currently pregnant, or if you have had a baby in the last six months, get your doctor’s clearance for travel

If your medical history includes deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, blood disorders, cancer, etc., make sure your doctor clears you for travel.

If you are taking contraceptives for medical reasons or a hormonal medication such as thyroxin, get your doctor to prescribe quantities for your travel duration. Keep copies of the prescription for proof

General Precautions

Before traveling, check if your prescription medication is legal in the country you plan to visit.

Carry your doctor’s letter detailing your previous and present medical history, recommendations for treatments and medical prescriptions

Inform your friends and family of your travel plans and stay in touch with them via phone, online chat and email. This way, if you’re not in touch for a couple of days, they’ll know to contact the local home country embassy and police station.

Put the number for police and emergency services on speed dial on your cell phone.

Always use condoms; buy a few condoms at a time and don’t use old ones. Be sure to check the expiry dates

Learn the local language for existing medical conditions if any and how to call for emergency help. Also know what local medication brands correspond to your prescriptions.

Food and drink safety

If you must eat local food offered by street vendors, sample a little and then wait to see how well your body accepts the food.

Don’t eat too much of anything; sometimes the body is fine with small portions but will balk at large portions of unfamiliar food.

Keep a list of water and food borne diseases in the specific area.

Always boil and filter tap water before drinking. Make sure that the seal is intact on bottled water.

Keep some anti-bacterial wipes handy all the time, and clean your hands often.